Song Lyric Sunday — Landslide

The theme for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday is “natural disasters.” I chose the Stevie Nicks song, “Landslide.”

What’s that you say? That song is not about a natural disaster? Of course it is. Just try to tell someone who has experienced a landslide that it’s not a disaster. And Donald Trump claims to have won the Electoral College by a landslide, and that was the epitome of a disaster — a national disaster! In fact, it was an international disaster.

But I digress. “Landslide” was written by Stevie Nicks and performed by the British-American music group Fleetwood Mac. It was first featured on the band’s self-titled 1975 album, Fleetwood Mac, released on the Reprise label. That album was the first Fleetwood Mac album to feature Lindsey Buckingham as guitarist and Stevie Nicks as vocalist.

Stevie Nicks says she wrote the song while visiting Aspen, Colorado, sitting in someone’s living room looking out at the Rocky Mountains and pondering the avalanche of everything that had come crashing down on her, particularly in her relationship with Lindsey Buckingham. She said that her life “truly felt like a landslide in many ways.”

Here are the song’s lyrics.

I took my love, I took it down
I climbed a mountain and I turned around
And I saw my reflection in the snow-covered hills
‘Till the landslide brought me down

Oh, mirror in the sky, what is love?
Can the child within my heart rise above?
Can I sail through the changing ocean tides?
Can I handle the seasons of my life?

Well, I’ve been afraid of changing
‘Cause I’ve built my life around you
But time makes you bolder
Even children get older
And I’m getting older too

Well, I’ve been afraid of changing
‘Cause I’ve built my life around you
But time makes you bolder
Even children get older
And I’m getting older too
Oh, I’m getting older too

Oh, take my love, take it down
Oh, climb a mountain and turn around
And if you see my reflection in the snow-covered hills
Well the landslide will bring it down
And if you see my reflection in the snow-covered hills
Well the landslide will bring it down, oh oh
The landslide will bring it down

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Song Lyric Sunday — Brain Damage

This week’s Song Lyric Sunday prompt is “madness.” As a long time Pink Floyd fan, it is only natural that the band’s song “Brain Damage” would come to mind when the word “madness” is bandied about.

“Brain Damage” is a track from English rock band Pink Floyd’s 1973 album “The Dark Side of the Moon.” The song was written by Roger Waters, who also performed the vocals on the track. The song was never released as a single.

Waters wrote the insanity-themed song based on former Pink Floyd frontman Syd Barrett’s mental instability. The line, “The lunatic is on the grass” reflects society’s contempt for “uncustomary” behavior. Normal, sane people walk on the path, while the man who steps on the grass is the “lunatic.”

Similarly, the moon has often been associated with insanity and darkness, and in the line, “I’ll see you on the dark side of the moon,” Waters was expressing that he could relate to Barrett’s feelings and to his form of madness.

The line, “And if the band you’re in starts playing different tunes” is a specific reference to Syd Barrett’s propensity for playing the wrong song on stage during his “episodes.”

Here are the song’s lyrics.

The lunatic is on the grass
The lunatic is on the grass
Remembering games and daisy chains and laughs
Got to keep the loonies on the path

The lunatic is in the hall
The lunatics are in my hall
The paper holds their folded faces to the floor
And every day the paper boy brings more

And if the dam breaks open many years too soon
And if there is no room upon the hill
And if your head explodes with dark forebodings too
I’ll see you on the dark side of the moon

The lunatic is in my head
The lunatic is in my head
You raise the blade, you make the change
You re-arrange me ’til I’m sane

You lock the door and throw away the key
There’s someone in my head but it’s not me.

And if the cloud bursts thunder in your ear
You shout and no one seems to hear
And if the band you’re in starts playing different tunes
I’ll see you on the dark side of the moon

Song Lyric Sunday — Bubblegum Music

For this  week’s Song Lyric Sunday, the prompt is “sugar/candy.” I’m positive that many of my fellow bloggers will select the same song I have chosen, since it’s all about sugar and candy!

“Sugar, Sugar” was a song written by Jeff Barry and Andy Kim. It was originally recorded by the virtual band the Archies, a group that performed on the Saturday morning cartoon show, Archie. The song falls in the genre of pop music known as “bubblegum music.” Bubblegum music, which was popular in the late 60s and early 70s, had an upbeat sound designed to appeal to pre-teens and teenagers.

According to Jeff Barry, he and Andy Kim wrote this song with preschoolers in mind since that was the audience for the Archie TV show. The “you are my candy girl” line came from them thinking about what kids that age like (candy).

The song was initially released in late May 1969, on the Calendar label, but achieved only moderate chart success until it was re-released in mid-July 1969 on the Kirshner label, where it became a massive success by late summer/early fall. It reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1969 and remained there for four weeks.

Here are the song’s lyrics.

Sugar, ah honey honey
You are my candy girl
And you got me wanting you

Honey, ah sugar sugar
You are my candy girl
And you’ve got me wanting you

I just can’t believe the loveliness of loving you
(I just can’t believe it’s true)
I just can’t believe the one to love this feeling to
(I just can’t believe it’s true)

Ah sugar, ah honey honey
You are my candy girl
And you’ve got me wanting you

Ah honey, ah sugar sugar
You are my candy girl
And you’ve got me wanting you

When I kissed you, girl, I knew how sweet a kiss could be
(I know how sweet a kiss can be)
Like the summer sunshine pour your sweetness over me
(Pour your sweetness over me)
Oh sugar, pour a little sugar on it honey

Pour a little sugar on it baby
I’m gonna make your life so sweet, yeah yeah yeah
Pour a little sugar on it oh yeah
Pour a little sugar on it honey
Pour a little sugar on it baby
I’m gonna make your life so sweet, yeah yeah yeah
Pour a little sugar on it honey

Ah sugar, ah honey honey
You are my candy girl
And you’ve got me wanting you
Oh honey, honey, sugar sugar
(Honey, honey, sugar sugar)
You are my candy girl

Song Lyric Sunday —Danger Heartbreak Dead Ahead

Today’s Song Lyric Sunday theme is “danger.” What came to mind for this prompt was the song recorded by the Marvelettes, an American girl group that was popular in the early- to mid-1960s, titled, “Danger Heartbreak Dead Ahead.”

The song, written by Clarence O. Paul, Ivy Jo Hunter, and William Stevenson, was released in July 1965 on the Tamla/Motown label. “Danger Heartbreak Dead Ahead,” another uptempo single by the Marvelettes, didn’t do that well on the charts. It failed to even crack the top 60.

The song’s relatively poor performance was disappointing for a group that was one of the early successes for Motown Records. The Marvelettes was the first significantly successful girl group after the release of their 1961 single, “Please Mr. Postman.” It was one of the first number-one singles recorded by an all-female vocal group and the first by a Motown recording act.

Danger Heartbreak Dead Ahead is a warning to women to be careful in the game of love. Here are the lyrics.

When you give more than you get
You’re in danger (You’re in danger)
You may find that you’re in love with a stranger
(With a stranger)
For who knows what evil lurks within the hearts of men?

It’s vanity
Insanity to play when you can’t win
When you find that you’re losing
It’s time to get on moving
Cause there’s danger: heartbreak dead ahead

It only takes one second, girl, to learn
(To learn)
That playing with fire will get you burned
(Get you burned)
Now girl, don’t you be foolish

They say that love is blind
But it’s clear as the highway sign
That reads “Danger: heartbreak dead ahead”
Heartbreak dead ahead

Read the sign, girl
You’d better mind, girl
Yeah, danger: heartbreak dead ahead

Bonnie Raitt recorded a cover of this song in 1971 that you might enjoy.

Song Lyric Sunday — Take Two

Earlier today, I posted my response to this week’s Song Lyric Sunday prompt, which was the word “pretending.” But when I saw that my blogging friend, Jim, used the same song as I did, “The Pretender” by Jackson Brown, I wondered if there might be another song I could use.

Then, as I was waking my dog and listening to iTunes on my iPhone, I heard this song:

“How Long” is a 1974 song by the British group Ace from their album Five-A-Side. It reached No. 3 in the US.

I always assumed this song was about a secret affair, but it was actually written by lead singer Paul Carack when he found out that Ace bassist Terry Comer was secretly working with two other bands at the same time he was playing for Ace. When he wrote this song, Carack felt betrayed by Comer. Interestingly, Comer returned to the band in time to play on the recording of the song..

Here are the song’s lyrics.

How long has this been going on?
How long has this been going on?

Well, if friends with their fancy persuasion
Don’t admit that it’s part of a scheme
But I can’t help but have my suspicions
‘Cause I ain’t quite as dumb as I seem

And you said you was never intending
To break up our scene this way
But there ain’t any use in pretending
It could happen to us any day

How long has this been going on?
How long has this been going on?

Oh, your friends with their fancy persuasion
Don’t admit that it’s part of a scheme
But I can’t help but have my suspicions
‘Cause I ain’t quite as dumb as I seem

Oh, you said you was never intending
To break up our scene this way
But there ain’t any use in pretending
It could happen to us any day

And how long has this been going on?
How long has this been going on?
(How long?)
How long has this been going on?
(How long has this?)

How long has this been going on?
(How long?)
How long has this been going on?