The Swagger of the Sagger

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I’ve already written one post about manscaping and another one about murses and fanny packs. So why not, I thought, go for the trifecta when it comes to men’s fashion trends?

Today’s men’s fashion topic is “sagging,” which is a way of wearing pants that sag so that the top of the pants are significantly below the waist — sometimes even below the butt — to reveal much of the wearer’s underwear.

Supposedly, the origin of sagging came from prisons, where the inmates, who were prohibited from wearing belts, often wore sagging prison-issued uniforms, and they carried that look with them once they were back on the outside.

The problem, though, is that pants were never intended to be worn that way. They are supposed to be worn at the waist. That’s how they’re designed. That’s how they fit.

So what the hell is going on with guys who wear their pants with the top at or below their butt cheeks? I can’t imagine that it’s comfortable to wear pants that way. And since most of those I see wearing their pants like that have belts on, it’s not because their pants are too large and keep falling down.

Maybe they want to show off their fancy boxer shorts. After all, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a guy who wears tighty-whities sagging his pants. Is it suppose to be a fashion statement?

Maybe those who sag think it gives them swagger, the appearance of defiance or insolence. Maybe they’re tying to send the message that they are dangerous dudes and are not to be messed with.

Well, I just don’t get it. If sagging is a fashion statement, I would really like someone explain it to me. Because if it’s meant to send a message about the sagger, the only message I’m getting is that they look totally ridiculous.

But hey, I’m just an aging Baby Boomer. I used to wear tie-dyed t-shirts and bell bottom jeans. So what do I know?

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Right and Wrong

 

 

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“That’s not right,” she chided me. “You’re totally wrong.”

“Well, I may not always be right,” I freely admitted, “but I’m never wrong.”

A look of incredulity came over her face. “What? That makes no sense.”

“But I’m not wrong,” I responded. “Case closed.”

“Are you freakin’ kidding me? If you say you’re never wrong, then by definition, you are always right. So how can you say you’re never wrong while also saying you may not always be right?”

“Exactly,” I responded.

“What kind of response is that to what I just said?” she asked, anger starting to overtake her.

“It’s the right answer.”

“No, it’s not the right answer.”

“Who says what is right and what is wrong?”

“You’re an asshole.”

“That’s right.” I said. “End of discussion.”

June Gloom

 

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Photo credit: retiredandtravelling.com

June gloom really is a thing along the Pacific coast.

It’s not as if the sun doesn’t shine in Northern California throughout the month of June. It does. In fact, the sun shines on many days, even in June. But often you don’t see it until the middle to the late afternoon, if at all on some days.

June mornings at or near the coast in the San Francisco Bay area are typically cool, misty, foggy, and cloudy. But if you head east across the Bay only a few miles inland, you’ll find mostly sunny skies and much warmer temperatures — even in June.

I don’t mind June gloom. In fact, I prefer the cool, crisp air to the high heat and humidity June brings to other parts of the country. It’s also a precursor of sunny days to follow.

And according to the weather app on my iPhone, it will turn sunny by around 1 p.m.


This post was written for today’s One-word prompt: Sunny.